SOUTH AFRICA-BUILT NANO-SATELLITES READY TO BE PLACED IN ORBIT

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa is set to launch two nano-satellites (cubesats) from the International Space Station (ISS) during March and June this year.

The nSight1 cubesat was designed and built by SCS Space, a member of the South African privately owned SCS Aerospace Group of companies. It will be launched as part of a European Commission research programme called QB50 which consists of 50 satellites originating from different countries.

The primary mission of the QB50 network of satellites is to perform first-class science in the largely unexplored lower thermosphere.

A nano-satellite is a small and low-weight satellite of between one and 10 kilogrammes which mostly orbits low Earth between 500 and 700 kilometres above the Earth’s surface.

The QB50 satellites weighs 2.5 kg and the aims to collect data over a period of 18 months in order to learn more about the Earth’s atmosphere and resources. In the case of the QB50 project, the orbit will be at 320 km considering the launch from the ISS.

SCS Space Chief Executive Officer Hendrik Burger said Wednesday: “The project was envisioned as a European Union initiative where 50 different companies, entities and universities from various countries are participating in the program by providing their own satellites. SCS Space had the unique opportunity of contributing the nSight1 nano-satellite to this international programme.”

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

SOUTH AFRICA-BUILT NANO-SATELLITES READY TO BE PLACED IN ORBIT

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa is set to launch two nano-satellites (cubesats) from the International Space Station (ISS) during March and June this year.

The nSight1 cubesat was designed and built by SCS Space, a member of the South African privately owned SCS Aerospace Group of companies. It will be launched as part of a European Commission research programme called QB50 which consists of 50 satellites originating from different countries.

The primary mission of the QB50 network of satellites is to perform first-class science in the largely unexplored lower thermosphere.

A nano-satellite is a small and low-weight satellite of between one and 10 kilogrammes which mostly orbits low Earth between 500 and 700 kilometres above the Earth’s surface.

The QB50 satellites weighs 2.5 kg and the aims to collect data over a period of 18 months in order to learn more about the Earth’s atmosphere and resources. In the case of the QB50 project, the orbit will be at 320 km considering the launch from the ISS.

SCS Space Chief Executive Officer Hendrik Burger said Wednesday: “The project was envisioned as a European Union initiative where 50 different companies, entities and universities from various countries are participating in the program by providing their own satellites. SCS Space had the unique opportunity of contributing the nSight1 nano-satellite to this international programme.”

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK